Day 4 - Quarter Finals - Evening

The only defending champion left in the draw is men's doubles world #1 Yoo Yeon Seong / Lee Yong Dae of Korea. In this week's world rankings that were released yesterday, India's Saina Nehwal swapped back to the top spot for the third time with China's Li Xuerui however both failed to proceed into Saturday's draw. Denmark are doing much better than last year and posted three semi-finalists, two in men's singles and predictably in women's doubles.

 

 

MD: DROPPING DOWN TO THIRD GEAR

Yoo/Lee are the only non-Chinese pair proceeding into the semi-finals thus China are assured of finalist already. The Korean 2014 Australian Open champions comfortably dispatched the 2011 Aussie champs and world #2 Japanese Hiroyuki Endo / Kenichi Hayakawa with sheer pace of their attack. This first plan worked and there was hardly a need to vary it to reach, 21-10, 21-16.

 

WS: TOP SEED OUT

Sometimes you lose the match but gain fans as did tournament top seed Li who came from what seemed like too far behind to rescue the deciding game to within one point (or maybe one stroke) of leveling. In the longest rally of that game, the Chinese made an impatient unforced error in executing her signature cross court dropshot to the opponent's forehand side because of not preparing properly for it. Instead of 18-18, Korea's Sung Ji Hyun continued maintaining a buffer which she clutched tightly until the end, 21-17, 10-21, 21-17.

"There are no tall girls in the Korean team so I train with the men to simulate what to expect with the tall Chinese players", explained Sung of her success.

 

MS: DASHING DANES DASH HOPES OF THAILAND AND CHINA

Denmark may be 2015 men's singles champion because first time visitor to our shores Jan O Jorgensen and Viktor Axelsen earned the right to meet each other tomorrow.

Jorgensen took care of China's Wang Zhengming in three games but has yet to be really tested at this Superseries. Axelsen had the good fortune of his Thai opponent hitting a sitting duck into the net and not needing to stare down game point in the opener. Ponsana had the skills to cover the court against his tall Danish adversary but not being able to secure the opener after closing a six point deficit was too much energy and confidence spent and he succumbed 19-21, 15-21 to the world #9.